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erectile dysfunctionErectile dysfunction is a common problem that affects many men. This being said, it is important to explore its causes and how it can be addressed. Because of testosterone’s prominence in men’s sexual function, it has been explored as a determining factor in erectile dysfunction. The following study describes how erectile dysfunction and low libido may be related to available testosterone in the body.  It also examines how supplementing this testosterone deficiency may provide a better for you.

 Different Types of Testosterone for Erectile Dysfunction   

Many do not know that there are different types of testosterone in the body and that it is important to take note of their individual levels within a person’s system. The testosterone level measured when men go to the doctor is typically limited only to Total Testosterone.  Patients only get the sum of unbound and bound testosterone present in the patient’s system.

The problem with this that the total amount of testosterone measured is not always fully available for use. Because of the presence of bound and unbound testosterone in the system, the Total Testosterone measurement for a person may not equal the precise amount of testosterone he is actually able to utilize.  This is called Free Testosterone.

This is because bound and unbound testosterone are indicators of whether or not a testosterone can be immediately used by the body this Free Testosterone is a more important measure. A bound testosterone is one attached to proteins that need prior removal before it can be used, thereby needing some effort to be utilized. One of the proteins that binds to testosterones is albumin. While albumin does attach to testosterones, it is easily removed by the body when the testosterone is needed.

However, there are also particularly stubborn binding proteins that cannot be removed from the testosterone, thus rendering it unusable. An example of this is the Sex hormone binding globulin, or SBHG. Once SBHG attaches to your testosterone, it becomes unusable due to the difficulty of separating the protein from the testosterone, limiting the amount of available testosterone in the body.

The differences in functions and availability of these kinds of testosterone highlight the need to test for different types of testosterone. In studying testosterone levels in the system, it’s important to take into account the level of total testosterone, bio-available testosterone and free testosterone, along with the prevalence of SBHG proteins in the patients.

Free testosterone refers to unbound testosterones which are readily available to the body and thus, can be used with minimal effort. Bio-available testosterone, on the other hand, corresponds to both the free testosterones and testosterones bound to easily removed proteins such as albumin. SBHG limits the amount of Bio-available testosterone, giving a skewed amount of usable testosterone when analyzing the total count.

Erectile dysfunction’s relationship to your testosterone levels

Because of testosterone’s role as a primary sex hormone that establishes male traits and sex drive, research has been made to explore how testosterone levels and erectile function influence each other.

According to the study, there exists a proportional correlation between testosterone levels and erectile function, linking higher levels of the hormone with an increased sex drive and better erections. In addition to this, it also established that low testosterone levels was consistently present in cases of erectile dysfunction, and that low presence of the hormone may hamper erectile dysfunction medications such as Viagra from working properly.

Ultimately, the study concluded that a low amount of free testosterone coupled with high levels of SHBG posed the highest risk for erectile dysfunction in men, emphasizing the importance of monitoring testosterone levels when addressing the problem. Taking from the study, it goes that while there are many factors that can contribute to erectile function, it is useful to check testosterone levels because it was seen as a consistent influencing factor for erectile dysfunction as based on the data.

Because of testosterone’s effect on erectile dysfunction, aging men who are experiencing its symptoms are advised to first take a testosterone blood test that can measure the amount of total testosterone, free-testosterone and SHBG in their system. Because ultimately, it is free testosterone that determines the ready supply of the hormone in men, testing total testosterone may not provide sufficient information regarding one’s actual hormone levels. By testing all levels of testosterone, doctors may be able to determine if it is this deficit in available testosterone that hampers proper erectile function and sexual performance, providing the patient with better options of addressing the problem.

Hormone Therapeutics can help you learn more about testosterone

With the emergence of treatments for low testosterone levels today, you don’t have to bear its consequences anymore.  This is why we have so many wives reaching out to us as well to find help for their loved one.  Hormone Therapeutics can help you determine if low testosterone that is causing your sexual problems and provide testosterone replacement therapy, to remedy your concerns. We can treat with testosterone therapy, and/or erectile dysfunction treatments. 

If you want to learn more about how to monitor your testosterone levels or fix low testosterone concentration and its consequences, our company can help you clear up your reservations. Give us a call and we’ll be happy to assist you as you take your first step towards improving your quality of life.

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